Foot and Ankle

The surgical specialists at Lowcountry Orthopaedic diagnose and treat all conditions of the foot and ankle, including advanced fracture treatment. Their goal is to get you back on your feet as quickly, painlessly, and safely as possible. Your condition is unique to you, so will be the treatment from your orthpaedist at Lowcountry Orthopaedics.

Arthritis

Source: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00209

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. It can occur at any age, and literally means "pain within a joint." As a result, arthritis is a term used broadly to refer to a number of different conditions.

Although there is no cure for arthritis, there are many treatment options available. It is important to seek help early so that treatment can begin as soon as possible. With treatment, people with arthritis are able to manage pain, stay active, and live fulfilling lives, often without surgery.

DESCRIPTION

There are three types of arthritis that may affect your foot and ankle.

OSTEOARTHRITIS

Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative or "wear and tear" arthritis, is a common problem for many people after they reach middle age. Over the years, the smooth, gliding surface covering the ends of bones (cartilage) becomes worn and frayed. This results in inflammation, swelling, and pain in the joint.

Osteoarthritis progresses slowly and the pain and stiffness it causes worsens over time.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

Unlike osteoarthritis which follows a predictable pattern in certain joints, rheumatoid arthritis is a system-wide disease. It is an inflammatory disease where the patient's own immune system attacks and destroys cartilage.

POST-TRAUMATIC ARTHRITIS

Post-traumatic arthritis can develop after an injury to the foot or ankle. This type of arthritis is similar to osteoarthritis and may develop years after a fracture, severe sprain, or ligament injury.

CAUSE

OSTEOARTHRITIS

Many factors increase your risk for developing osteoarthritis. Because the ability of cartilage to heal itself decreases as we age, older people are more likely to develop the disease. Other risk factors include obesity and family history of the disease.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

The exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis is not known. Although it is not an inherited disease, researchers believe that some people have genes that make them more susceptible. There is usually a "trigger," such as an infection or environmental factor, which activates the genes. When the body is exposed to this trigger, the immune system begins to produce substances that attack the joint. This is what may lead to the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

POST-TRAUMATIC ARTHRITIS

Fractures - particularly those that damage the joint surface - and dislocations are the most common injuries that lead to this type of arthritis. An injured joint is about seven times more likely to become arthritic, even if the injury is properly treated. In fact, following injury, your body can secrete hormones that stimulate the death of your cartilage cells.

ANATOMY

There are 28 bones and more than 30 joints in the foot. Tough bands of tissue, called ligaments, keep the bones and joints in place. If arthritis develops in one or more of these joints, balance and walking may be affected.

Joints and bones of the foot and ankle.

The joints most commonly affected by arthritis in the lower extremity include:

  • The ankle (tibiotalar joint). The ankle is where the shinbone (tibia) rests on the uppermost bone of the foot (the talus).
  • The three joints of the hindfoot. These three joints include:
    • The subtalar or talocalcaneal joint, where the bottom of the talusconnects to the heel bone (calcaneus);
    • The talonavicular joint, where the talus connects to the inner midfoot bone (navicular); and
    • The calcaneocuboid joint, where the heel bone connects to the outer midfoot bone (cuboid).
  • The midfoot (metatarsocunieform joint